In 1869 the Basque emigrant Ángel Vélaz bought 1,000 hectares from an old family of colonial times; and established a general store where the few inhabitants of the area would meet to cope with the desert heat, being distant and the silence. The wagons that came along the Camino Real also passed by, bringing local fruits and mail; crossing the infinite pampas, in times when there were no fences, no groves, no mills, and no trains.

 

Within this grocery store, called “La Esquina de Vélaz”, congregated on Sundays the recently-arrived European immigrants and the “gauchos” (still dressed in their “chiripá” (chaps) and cowboy boots; who, being under the influence of alcohol and flashing their “facones” (gun gear); forced to protect the grocer behind iron bars.

 

Camila O'Gorman passed along the Camino Real - named after the authorization of the Spanish monarch - that traversed from San Antonio de Areco to Pilar on his march towards his execution and, so did Don Segundo Ramírez the figure idealized by Ricardo Güiraldes in his work "Don Segundo Sombra"; herding cattle to Buenos Aires. In 1871 this same house housed the entire family and residents of the area for three months, when the terrible yellow fever epidemic hit our capital: Buenos Aires.

 

The daughter of Ángel Vélaz, María -married to Eduardo Goyenechea- in the early years of the 20th century, improved the estate providing modern construction for greater comforts; an important re-forestation, a bird sanctuary and an exotic garden. It was thus that it became one of the most frequented establishments of the Exaltación de la Cruz and Pilar parties. The old house still preserves the truly original style which brings together the colonial, trends, mixed with Italian and art-nouveau designs

 

Its main garden, lush with exotic and varied vegetation, also boasts sesquicentennial trees and the presence of the tallest free-standing tree in Buenos Aires and its surroundings.

 

The gradual modernization of the times was expressed through the installation of the windmill, more landscaping, the more functional kitchen, and the English-style plumbing system that later was extended to the entire town. So many innovations led to the original name "La Mariane" by the owner's wife, to become "La Mimosa"; a term of the time, reflecting the dedication that its owner put in for its aesthetic and functional improvement.

 

 

 

 

 

 

History

ESTANCIA LA MIMOSA ©

 

In 1869 the Basque emigrant Ángel Vélaz bought 1,000 hectares from an old family of colonial times; and established a general store where the few inhabitants of the area would meet to cope with the desert heat, being distant and the silence. The wagons that came along the Camino Real also passed by, bringing local fruits and mail; crossing the infinite pampas, in times when there were no fences, no groves, no mills, and no trains.

 

Within this grocery store, called “La Esquina de Vélaz”, congregated on Sundays the recently-arrived European immigrants and the “gauchos” (still dressed in their “chiripá” (chaps) and cowboy boots; who, being under the influence of alcohol and flashing their “facones” (gun gear); forced to protect the grocer behind iron bars.

 

Camila O'Gorman passed along the Camino Real - named after the authorization of the Spanish monarch - that traversed from San Antonio de Areco to Pilar on his march towards his execution and, so did Don Segundo Ramírez the figure idealized by Ricardo Güiraldes in his work "Don Segundo Sombra"; herding cattle to Buenos Aires. In 1871 this same house housed the entire family and residents of the area for three months, when the terrible yellow fever epidemic hit our capital: Buenos Aires.

 

The daughter of Ángel Vélaz, María -married to Eduardo Goyenechea- in the early years of the 20th century, improved the estate providing modern construction for greater comforts; an important re-forestation, a bird sanctuary and an exotic garden. It was thus that it became one of the most frequented establishments of the Exaltación de la Cruz and Pilar parties. The old house still preserves the truly original style which brings together the colonial, trends, mixed with Italian and art-nouveau designs

 

Its main garden, lush with exotic and varied vegetation, also boasts sesquicentennial trees and the presence of the tallest free-standing tree in Buenos Aires and its surroundings.

 

The gradual modernization of the times was expressed through the installation of the windmill, more landscaping, the more functional kitchen, and the English-style plumbing system that later was extended to the entire town. So many innovations led to the original name "La Mariane" by the owner's wife, to become "La Mimosa"; a term of the time, reflecting the dedication that its owner put in for its aesthetic and functional improvement.

 

 

 

 

 

In 1869 the Basque emigrant Ángel Vélaz bought 1,000 hectares from an old family of colonial times; and established a general store where the few inhabitants of the area would meet to cope with the desert heat, being distant and the silence. The wagons that came along the Camino Real also passed by, bringing local fruits and mail; crossing the infinite pampas, in times when there were no fences, no groves, no mills, and no trains.

 

Within this grocery store, called “La Esquina de Vélaz”, congregated on Sundays the recently-arrived European immigrants and the “gauchos” (still dressed in their “chiripá” (chaps) and cowboy boots; who, being under the influence of alcohol and flashing their “facones” (gun gear); forced to protect the grocer behind iron bars.

 

Camila O'Gorman passed along the Camino Real - named after the authorization of the Spanish monarch - that traversed from San Antonio de Areco to Pilar on his march towards his execution and, so did Don Segundo Ramírez the figure idealized by Ricardo Güiraldes in his work "Don Segundo Sombra"; herding cattle to Buenos Aires. In 1871 this same house housed the entire family and residents of the area for three months, when the terrible yellow fever epidemic hit our capital: Buenos Aires.

 

The daughter of Ángel Vélaz, María -married to Eduardo Goyenechea- in the early years of the 20th century, improved the estate providing modern construction for greater comforts; an important re-forestation, a bird sanctuary and an exotic garden. It was thus that it became one of the most frequented establishments of the Exaltación de la Cruz and Pilar parties. The old house still preserves the truly original style which brings together the colonial, trends, mixed with Italian and art-nouveau designs

 

Its main garden, lush with exotic and varied vegetation, also boasts sesquicentennial trees and the presence of the tallest free-standing tree in Buenos Aires and its surroundings.

 

The gradual modernization of the times was expressed through the installation of the windmill, more landscaping, the more functional kitchen, and the English-style plumbing system that later was extended to the entire town. So many innovations led to the original name "La Mariane" by the owner's wife, to become "La Mimosa"; a term of the time, reflecting the dedication that its owner put in for its aesthetic and functional improvement.

 

 

 

 

 

 

In 1869 the Basque emigrant Ángel Vélaz bought 1,000 hectares from an old family of colonial times; and established a general store where the few inhabitants of the area would meet to cope with the desert heat, being distant and the silence. The wagons that came along the Camino Real also passed by, bringing local fruits and mail; crossing the infinite pampas, in times when there were no fences, no groves, no mills, and no trains.

 

Within this grocery store, called “La Esquina de Vélaz”, congregated on Sundays the recently-arrived European immigrants and the “gauchos” (still dressed in their “chiripá” (chaps) and cowboy boots; who, being under the influence of alcohol and flashing their “facones” (gun gear); forced to protect the grocer behind iron bars.

 

Camila O'Gorman passed along the Camino Real - named after the authorization of the Spanish monarch - that traversed from San Antonio de Areco to Pilar on his march towards his execution and, so did Don Segundo Ramírez the figure idealized by Ricardo Güiraldes in his work "Don Segundo Sombra"; herding cattle to Buenos Aires. In 1871 this same house housed the entire family and residents of the area for three months, when the terrible yellow fever epidemic hit our capital: Buenos Aires.

 

The daughter of Ángel Vélaz, María -married to Eduardo Goyenechea- in the early years of the 20th century, improved the estate providing modern construction for greater comforts; an important re-forestation, a bird sanctuary and an exotic garden. It was thus that it became one of the most frequented establishments of the Exaltación de la Cruz and Pilar parties. The old house still preserves the truly original style which brings together the colonial, trends, mixed with Italian and art-nouveau designs

 

Its main garden, lush with exotic and varied vegetation, also boasts sesquicentennial trees and the presence of the tallest free-standing tree in Buenos Aires and its surroundings.

 

The gradual modernization of the times was expressed through the installation of the windmill, more landscaping, the more functional kitchen, and the English-style plumbing system that later was extended to the entire town. So many innovations led to the original name "La Mariane" by the owner's wife, to become "La Mimosa"; a term of the time, reflecting the dedication that its owner put in for its aesthetic and functional improvement.